Tag Archives: pattern

Faux Crochet Entrelac (Like Faux Fur, but BETTER!)

29 Nov

Hello readers,

Beautiful Cowl-ness

I recently had to insert a project into my Christmas knitting extravaganza to make a birthday present. I needed something quick and cute and decided to make a cute cowl. I used used one of the cable patterns from the Sólás Caomh by Jodi Euchner and modified it to be cowl-friendly. I used some Lion Brand Yarn in Homespun Ambrosia to help me stash bust – it was the perfect hue for the birthday girl.

Faux Cable Cowl Pattern
Be sure to make your tension loose and be generous with the yarn being used in each stitch. If you pull tight and uniform, you will have a lot of gaps between the cables and it won’t feel so warm.

Using Bulky Yarn (weight 5) and a J hook (6 mm)
Glossary: BPdc – Back post double crochet; ch- Chain; dc – double crochet; FPdc/tr – Front post double crochet/triple crochet;
hdc – half double crochet; sk – skipped; sts – stitches
(Trebles used in this pattern are American terminology so you would wrap the yarn twice around the hook before making a stitch)

Loosely Ch22

Row 1 (WS): DC all stitches

Row 2 (cable row): Ch3 (count as first stitch here and throughout the pattern), DC 1 in the next stitch
*Sk next 3 sts
FPtr in the next 3 sts
Working in front of sts just made FPtr in 3 sk sts*
Repeat from * 3xs
Dc 2

Row 3: Ch 2, hdc 1 stitch
BPdc in 18 sts
Hdc 2

Row 4 (cable row): Ch 3, dc 1 stitch

A stylish Nanook

FPdc in next 3 sts
*Sk next 3 sts
FPtr in next 3 sts
Working behind sts just made FPtr in 3 skipped sts*
Repeat from * 2xs
FPdc in next 3 sts
Dc 2

Row 5: Repeat row 3

Row 6 (cable row): Ch 3, dc 1 stitch
*Sk next 3 sts
FPtr in next 3 sts
Working in front of sts just made FPtr in 3 sk sts*
Repeat * 3xs
Dc 2

Row 7: Ch 2, dc 1
BPdc 18 sts
Hdc 2

Row 8 (cable row): Ch 3, dc 1

The Birthday Girl strutting her handmade chic

FPdc in next 3 sts
*Sk next 3 sts
FPtr in next 3 sts
Working behind sts just made FPtr in 3 sk sts*
Repeat * 2xs
FPdc in next 3 sts
Dc 2

Row 9: Repeat row 7

Repeat rows 2-9 however many times you want. I did mine 12 times.
Finish – slip st ends together inside out to make a seam. Light blocking needed for this yarn.

A couple of other fun ideas you can do is end with multiple dc rows to sew buttons on and make it a cowl. I didn’t put a border on it because the scarf is just supposed to look like the interwoven cables. For those of you who HAVE to have some kind of gauge, a row should be about 1.5-2″ long for the right side and about 1-1.5″ long on a wrong side.

If you use this pattern, PLEASE, let me know what you think on my Ravelry pattern page. I really want to know how you peeps are rocking this design.

Workin’ my Crochet Creativity,
-Stacy C.

Not a Fern, a Piece of Art

29 Nov

The time has come for me to start cranking out some pattern reviews and I’m starting with my modification of the CashSilk Fern Scarf that I found on Ravelry.comI made this beauty with Lion Brand Superwash Merino Cashmere in Slate. Let me just preface this post by saying I was on the huge hunt for a skinny, somewhat lacy scarf and it took FOREVER to find anything close to what I was hoping to find.

The CashSilk Fern Scarf actually knits up twice as wide and a little shorter than what I did but it’s a great pattern that was easily modified. This pattern is relatively easy and gives a great fern/lacy look that appears much harder than it took to make.

There was one stitch that really tripped me up at first – the sskp. SSKP is not a normal stitch and it took me a bit to figure this one out and here’s how it’s done: slip two stitches, knit one stitch, then pass the previous slipped stitches over the knitted stitch. Easy, right? Right… I’ll break it down further, it’s basically a modified left slanting decrease or a S1K1Psso and this video will show you how to do it if you’re still having trouble (but remember, you slip two, knit one, THEN pass the stitches over).

The other note knitters should make is you MUST have a system to keep up with the row you are knitting. If you don’t consistently use a row counter, like myself, get to know the knitting pattern chart. I had to go back to it so many times to make sure I was on the right row. If you are off by one, it will mess up the look of the scarf so you have to pay attention unless you want a dead fern scarf. It’s not hard too keep up but “free spirit” knitters might hate the attention to detail, but it’s worth it.

My modifications: They start at the beginning of the pattern. I CO 36 stitches. Then I knit four rows garter stitch for a base border at each end. When I worked the pattern I slipped TWO stitches at the beginning and end of each row and only repeat the pattern once.

I knit this one longer than the pattern calls for because I wanted to be able to loop it around my neck and still have a some length. I didn’t iron it out once I was done because I like how skinny it looked when it folded over on itself. Which, works out for the knitting finish hater that I am.

Keepin’ it Classy,
-Stacy C.

Update 11/30/2011: This scarf, while not thick and a little dainty, keeps your neck WARM. After a couple of hours it feels like someone turned on the electric blanket. Not only cute but functional.

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