Tag Archives: Red Heart

Scharetta Bow Scarf Pattern

25 Mar
bowscarf3

The Birthday Girl, showing it off.

It’s a special crochet month with means you deserve a Stacy C original design! (Waiting for applause)
It’s been a few months since my last design and everyone seems to be getting a kick out of my “Faux Entrelac” pattern on Ravelry. And I’m trying to build my street cred… I mean, give you more creative ideas! I’ve noticed that my designs like to use a lot of chaining, but I’m ok with that. I’m taking a simple element and making it a fashion MUST. Have fun with my design and let me know either here or on its Ravelry Page, what you’ve made and what you think.

Hook: I (5.5 mm)
Yarn: Red Heart, Soft in Berry (Weight #4)
Amount used: 66 grams total for the scarf. 14 grams for the bow

Scarf base:
Ch 14, turn
Ch 1, sc 14. Cut

Close up.

Close up.

Scarf:
In the last sc, ch 250. Cut yarn leaving about a 2-yard tail

For the chains 2-14 continue in the following way:
In the next sc (to the right of the last one made) chain 20
Sl st into the left chain on its 20th stitch. You want to make sure when you slip the stitch that the chains line up. You only slip into the chain next to it, not all the chains.
*Ch 20 stitches, sl st into the left chain on its 20th stitch*. Repeat * section 9 times
On the last section ch 25, sl st into the left chain on its 25th stitch
Cut yarn after each chain is finished. Leave about a 4″ tail.

Scarf finishing base:
(Start working on the WS with all tail ends in front of you)
With the 2-yard tail from first chain, Hdc 14 into each chain end, turn
Ch 1, sc 14. Cut yarn

Scarf Finishing:
With the tail ends, you can either try to tuck all them into the short base. I decided to only tuck the tails that started and ended the base structure. I then took two tail ends next to each other, double knotted them, then snipped the ends. I did this for both bases.

Bow:
Ch 18, turn
*Ch1, sc 18, turn*, repeat * 4 times. Cut yarn
Bow will be about 3″ x 2″. Tuck in ends

Not too shabby.

Not too shabby.

Bow band:
Ch 8, turn
Ch1, Hdc 8, turn
Ch 1, sc 8. Cut yarn leaving an 8″ tail to sew bow onto scarf.

Blocking:
Because it’s Red Heart yarn, and pretty hearty (pun intended), I steam ironed the scarf separately from the bow. I also steam ironed the bow seperately from the scarf. While ironing the scarf I focused on one section at a time (between the slipped stitches is a “section”) making sure the chains faced right side before placing heat on them. I did iron the bow before and after I added the band. I only added heat for about 10-15 sections each time. I did do one last “once over” after I sewed the bow onto the scarf.

Bow sewing:
With your rectangle, squish the middle and wrap the band around it. Take care to center the band around the rectangle and sew a couple of stitches to secure the band. Now you can sew the bow onto the scarf.
I tried to sew the bow onto the chain section, but found that too difficult. Instead, I sewed the bow onto a sl stitch section, making it easier to anchor it, before tacking it down onto the scarf.

Voilá! You now have a snazzy scarf for the spring – and around here it just won’t quit snowing!

Continuing my FO fire!
-Stacy C.

Taking Basic Crochet Slippers a Notch Above the Rest

2 Apr

Hello readers, I was hoping to squeeze this last post in March to close out Crochet Month. Well, we’re ending it on April 1, around here! This doesn’t mean the last of crochet on this blog, not by a long shot, but I’ll stop mentioning the featured style for another 11 months! 😀

Spring into the season with these babies!

Today, is another highlight on a relatively easy crochet project, Crochet Slippers by Zoom Yummy, that I made in Red Heart’s Stitch Nation Bamboo Ewe in Beach Glass and Caron Simply Soft in Chocolate. (Of course the final project is available for purchase in my Etsy store… :-D)

Let me just prefice this post by saying the original blog post is very helpful with all the pictures for the different steps; however, I’m the kind of person who see it all in one place when I’m actually in the middle of the project and understand how the rounds are supposed to look. I decided to condense it all in this post before I go on to giving any tips and modifications. Please note, I didn’t change her pattern at all, this is exactly from the original post and all credit is due Zoom Yummy for the following:

Round 1: ch 5, join with sl st

Round 2: 3 ch, 7 dc into center of ring, join sl st

Round 3: 3 ch, 1 dc into 1st st, 2 dc each stitch after, join sl

Round 4: 3 ch, 1 dc into 1st st, 2 dc into each stitch after

Round 5-13: continue crocheting in spiral, 1 dc into each dc

Round 14: TURN, 3 ch, 1 dc into second stitch frm hook, make 20 dc (1 dc into each following dc)

Round 15-21: turn, 3 ch, 1 dc into second stitch frm hook, continue 20 dc (same as 14)

Round 22: turn, 3 ch, 1 dc into first stitch frm hook, continue 21 dc (1 dc into each next dc), another 1 dc into last stitch

Round 23-25: turn, 3 ch, 1 dc into second stitch frm hook, continue 22 dc (1 dc into each next dc)

Round 26: turn, 3 ch, 1 dc into first stitch frm hook, continue 23 dc (1 dc into each next dc), another 1 dc into last stitch

Round 27-28: turn, 3 ch, 1 dc into second stitch frm hook, continue 24 dc (1 dc into each next dc)

Finish off and weave in ends

Fold end in half and see it together. Make sure it’s turned out, then face seam facing forward.

Edging: tie yarn to the edge of the slipper, this counts as the first stitch.

2 ch

Then make 1 sc into the next bigger “hole”, make 1 ch, repeat

Finally make 1 sl st to join with the 1st

Finish off and weave in ends
###

Of course these are available in my Etsy shop!

Hope this abbreviated version helps the cliff noters, like me. Now on to my assessment and modifications: You’ll note the pattern doesn’t tell you what weight yarn or hook to use – even what size this final product makes.* This was hard, because I really had to look at multiple finished projects on ravelry.com to get an idea of where to even start. I made this first pair by using a yarn weight of 4 (or worsted), size H (or 5 mm) hook and ended up with a 8/9 in women’s sizes.

Additionally, to make this size, I jumped from round 10 to 14, cut out round 25 and 28 and still ended up with this bigger size. If you want to follow the pattern to a T, I suggest you use a yarn weight of 3 or even a 2 (DK or Sport weight) and possibly a smaller hook. My stitches are in the middle of tight and loose, they might slightly lean toward a little lose when I’m tired, if that helps you better gauge my assessment.

A couple of style modifications: I noticed that after Round 4, when you start another round and ch, using more than 1 or 2 ch stitches made the round more hole-y. I like my slippers to be tight for a little more warmth and only ch 1 before each row until Round 14. For the edging, I noticed the ch, in between sc stitches made the top wider. Except for the beginning pair of ch, I only sc stitch around the top.

Real classy

Pattern clarification: there was only one part where I got hung up on the pattern and that was how to start the edging. This is

where the pictures came in very handy, I threaded the yarn through, with the tail inside the slipper. Then, I made a slip not making sure the loop wrapped around the slipper. If you look closely at the slipper, that is how the loop counts as the first stitch, by wrapping around the edge stitch.

This is a great pattern, I know I pointed out a lot of hang ups and problems, but the pattern is a base – a starting point. What makes vague patterns great is you can make the finished product your own. But if you’re like me and want to know how to start; or pattern watchers who need to follow every step, this post was to help you own the slippers you make.

Working my Fancy Foot Style,

-Stacy C.

*I have since seen an adjustment with pertinent information to the pattern size. “(Oh, one important thing! These slippers were made to fit my feet, which are size 40 – Europe / 6.5 – UK / 9 – US. To adjust the size of these slippers to your feet you may need to change the number of rounds between the round 5 and 13 and the number or rows between the row 15 – 21 of this post. AND… I used worsted weight yarn and G – 4 mm hook to make the slippers.)”

Felt it up! (No, it’s not Feeling up)

30 Mar

It’s National Cleavage day and I couldn’t resist the title! Spring is right around the corner, this seems to be the PERFECT season to felt. We have eggs, flowers, purses, bowls, etc., the list goes on and is cute. Felting is one of those yarn projects that both knitting and crochet can do, so why not share a post for this month? There are different types of felting, felting sheets, rove felting and wet felting. We’re going to focus on wet wool felting (because that’s how it works for knitting and crocheting, we’ll talk other animal fibers later) and will refer to it from now on as “felting” – I hear by decree.

Through hours of trial and error, and following the scientific method (in the yarn world), I have come to the conclusion that four things, in order of importance, are necessary for proper felting: wool content, agitation, soap and hot water. You might think it interesting that hot water is at the end of the list. Let’s go through some of my felting projects to further explain:

Not the best picture, you get the idea

Mocassins for Him: I made these slippers for my dad last year, and they were the first thing I ever felted. I used Patons Classic Wool in deep olive and I can tell you, putting something I knit into the wash for the first time was so nerve racking! I used my top loading washer, some detergent, a couple pairs of dark colored pants, and went through two small loaded washes to get them to the size I wanted. When they came out, I was afraid they were too small and was worried about maintaining the shape. I had shoe forms to put into the slippers but they were too big and wouldn’t fit into my felted slipper. I decided to put them on the outside of my boots to get them to a bigger man size and it worked! My dad likes them and wears them to this day. Making sure to shape your felted item while it dries is important to remember, don’t go through all that trouble just to let it shrink dry.

Felted Fortune Cookies: I don’t yet have a picture for these because I still have to sew them into cookies. I didn’t get around to it before this post because I’ve been so annoyed with this project! I used the same wool as the slippers and tried the stove top method because I had two cookies and didn’t want to put them into the washer (I was trying to be eco). Let me tell you just stick to the washing machine method, it IS more eco.

Let’s begin this sage, I brought a large pot to a rolling boil and stuck my wool into it, then stood there and stirred it for twenty minutes and not much happened. The water got darker and the wool kind of got a little fuzzy. By fuzzy, I mean the look wool gets when it’s splashed with cold water. I decided to see if the rolling boil would help the wool, maybe my spoon was getting in the way. After 45 minutes, several gallons of water and maybe a millimeter of felting later, I decided to ramp this puppy up. I added some dish soap (the water was “pure” up until this point) got out my potato masher and went to town (as much as you can in boiling water) and I started to see some results!

After another 30 minutes the cookies had gotten smaller – by about .25 inches… I quickly realized, it was the agitation but I couldn’t produce enough to make it go faster without burning myself. Stirring isn’t enough agitation – mashing was the trick – I had to physically beat up the wool in hot water which isn’t really good for the skin, you know? I finally put my cookies into the washing machine and saw that it does more than stir, it is a hurricane of water movement. THAT is why you get such fantastic results in the washing machine – some times too good if you’re not careful. By the time I got to this point, I was tired of even looking at those cookies, just like you are of reading about this drama.

Al Green's "So in Love with You" keeps playing in my head

Fine Feather Cap: Yes, THE hat! This story begins with using the Lion Brand Yarn Wool-Ease, a wonderful acrylic and wool blend, but NOT made for felting. I knew there was a chance it wouldn’t work and I read the care instructions. But it has wool in it, I thought it might be possible. I did some research online and read how other people were told it doesn’t felt either, but it did for them. This is what I discovered – it doesn’t work for brand new, non-beat up wool. When I went back to these LIARS (it’s what it felt like after five failed felted loads, but I did get my too big jeans down to a wearable size!) I realized these ladies wore their favorite items almost daily by the time it went into the wash and felted. This causes me to believe if you beat the CRAP out of a low wool blend, you might have a shot of getting it to felt eons later. There’s more to this story in the last post, but to save time I will skip to the end.

Gonna shake these peacock feathers!

I finally got wonderful results using Patons Classic Wool in Aran; Red Heart’s Stitch Nation Full O’ Sheep in Passion Fruit, Mediterranean and Thyme; and this mystery yellow wool I got from a fellow yarn maker. I stuck to my tried and true method and as you can see, it was well worth all the hard work. I was so in love with the end result, I let the cap felt dry on my head! When I had to take it off for bed, I let it further dry on a plastic playground ball.

Even though some of my stories might seem daunting and appear to make felting not worth the effort, I’ve taken some of the tears out of it for you. If you haven’t ever tried it, think of this as a tutorial in what to avoid, and what to pay attention to, with your projects. I found a great tutorial by Lion Brand Yarn in the basics of this method (that reaffirms some of my follies too!). Also, for sticking with this post, I’m doing a giveaway! One luck reader will get a skein of Lion Brand Yarn Fisherman’s Wool in Natural Brown, with over 450 yds you’re sure to get a good project (or two!) out of it. To enter this great contest, leave a comment – for an extra entry, follow me on twitter (leave an additional comment to alert me that is why you followed me.) Entries must be received by Friday, April 20, 2012 and I will randomly select and announce the winner on Saturday, April 21, 2012.

Yes, I’m buying friends, but you’re ok with that because you might get more yarn, :-p
Stacy C.

It was a Scary YarnFix Moment

27 Mar

It’s Spring Semester and nearly the end of the year. We are certainly feeling it at work and last week was ROUGH. I started off the week with a super cute haircut and was feeling pretty good about the week; however, things got rough quickly.

Super Cute Haircut

I was deflated about a critique on a great event; a co-worker left suddenly and I was called in to work Saturday; I filled in for her absence and did my work as well; was faced with a dead squirrel as first order of business on Friday; and had to work late Friday then come back Saturday morning.

In the midst of all this craziness, I decided Thursday night, when I had 30 minutes to spare between work, Jaci and Bible Study, I was going to use a Lenten “pass” and get yarn for my super cute Easter Cloche crochet hat project. I mean, look at it, how could it not be amazing?!

Well, the therapy trip was kind of a disaster, as Susann can tell you. I was on the phone with her super excited that Stitch Nation Yarns were on super sale in the clearance section of the store. This was the yarn that I needed t o get for my cloche, great, I can hit this sale, and then get the color I want in the regular price section – WRONG! This great gift was just another punch in the gut. The store (AC Moore) is no longer carrying the line of yarns. Hence, they didn’t have my color! I was beside myself, they didn’t carry much wool, I couldn’t find the color I wanted with what they did have – WHY?! It was like the overstressed lady who went to get olives at the store and couldn’t find the right ones, then she has a breakdown in the aisle. I didn’t have a complete breakdown by consoling myself with carrying the sale yarns to the checkout. The soft fluffiness of super sales was a soothing balm. Poor Susan was on the phone talking to me trying to come up with ideas and I was just getting more and more panicked. I still chuckle at the, “uh, oh, um, where are you? I really don’t know what to do right now. Are there other yarns there? Look at the yarns!” from Susann’s voice in my ear while I was prowling the aisles. I eventually decided on Pattons Classic Yarn – a sturdy back up.

But the drama wasn’t just from the week I was having, it was what I’ve already gone through to make this project happen. My yarn obsession is alive and well even in crochet.

© Crochet Today!

I saw this Fine Feathered Cloche pattern on Ravelry.com while looking for a cute cloche pattern (due to the cute new hair cut) for Easter. I just kept coming back to this pattern, then decided I was going to make it and realized it came from a magazine issue two years ago! What was I going to do?! Well, I looked everywhere and could only find it for $14 – not gonna happen for one pattern. I was able to find a .pdf preview of it (never you mind how) and was able to blow up the .pdf on my computer and take pictures on my iPhone – that is DIY in a technology age.

I have the pattern, partway there, right? Wrong again! (No one’s gonna win this guessing game.) I didn’t have the white wool, I thought I did, but it was more of a tweed color – thanks yarn stash, for NOTHING! Well, I have two skeins of Lion Brand Wool-Ease Yarn in White Frost. It has wool in it, I shall try to felt with it! Luckily, AnteeJan, and her fabulous knitting on the couch teaching prowess, wisely told me to crochet a gauge. I decided she had a point and tried out her wisdom. I was pretty darn pleased I was only an inch off the gauge and threw it in the wash. Five loads later, it had fuzzed a considerable amount but didn’t felt much. NO!!!! At this point, I wasn’t really sure what to do and that lead up to Thursday’s diabolical trip.

All this drama and the hat looks pretty good, doesn’t it?

"The Hat"

Even through it all, I loved working on this project and I’m excited to see the final outcome. I know this isn’t the craziest crochet, or even yarn story! But my advice to all you crocheters/knitters is sometimes, you just need that yarn to make that one project that won’t leave your dreams.

Sigh* The things we do for our yarn addiction,
Stacy C

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